Your browser (Internet Explorer 6) is out of date. It has known security flaws and may not display all features of this and other websites. Learn how to update your browser.
X
Aside

Unit 41 – Sex Ed Stats

Difficulty: Medium/Hard

Time: 3 minutes

The passage below has been adapted from an article published on guardian.co.uk, written by Rachel Williams. 

 

A survey carried out as part of the 2001 census in the UK showed that fewer than half of teenage mothers were going to school when they got pregnant. About a quarter of boys and a third of girls who left school at 16 with no qualifications did not use contraception when they first had sex, compared to only 6% of boys and 8% girls who stayed on till 17 or over and got qualifications.

A 2008 study of 38 mostly poor, developing countries found that 15- to 17-year-old girls who were enrolled in school were less likely to have had sex than girls who weren’t in education. Nearly 13 million adolescent girls give birth each year in developing countries; a girl growing up in Chad is more likely to die in childbirth than she is to attend secondary school, according to the IPPF. But if a girl in the developing world receives seven or more years of education, on average she marries four years later and has 2.2 fewer children.

Leaving school also affects chances of picking up STIs: studies of HIV in Africa and Latin America have found that education lowers women’s risk of infection and the prevalance of risky behaviour.

The question is: without the natural hub for young people created by school to rely on, how do sexual health professionals ensure the most vulnerable teenagers get much needed education and access to services?

 

1. Based on the statistics provided in the passage which refer to the 2001 UK Census, which of the following is true?

  • A      Teenage girls are less than 50% likely to get pregnant while attending school
  • B      Only 33% of teenage mothers who left school at 16 used contraception the first time they had sex
  • C      15-17 year old girls are less likely to have sex if they are going to school
  • D      Girls are approximately 33% less likely than boys to use contraception

 

2. Overall, the information provided in the passage:

  • A      Shows that pregnancies are often due to a lack of education
  • B      Suggests that sexual education is more prominent in the developed world
  • C      Correlates education with decreased pregnancy and STI rates
  • D      Proves that lack of education is a contributory factor towards teen pregancy

 
 

  • Answers:
    Q1:D
    A is incorrect because the statistic we are given is that less than 50% of teenage mothers were going to school when they got pregnant. It suggests that those at school are less likely to get pregnant than those who are not at school, but this says nothing about the likelihood of a girl to get pregnant while attending school.
    B is an inversion of the facts. 33% of girls did NOT use contraception.
    C refers to information that was not provided in the Uk Census.
    D is, by elimination, the correct answer.
    “About a quarter of boys and a third of girls who left school at 16 with no qualifications did not use contraception when they first had sex, compared to only 6% of boys and 8% girls who stayed on till 17 or over and got qualifications.”
    Do a little bit of division and you will see that one third (33.3%) is just over 33% more than a quarter (25%) and 8 is 33.3% more than 6. Girls are approximately 33% less likely than boys to use contraception, whether or not they go to school.

    Q2:C
    The statistics suggest that there is a link between teen pregnancy and whether or not teens went to school, but nothing more. A&D are both the same, just with different words. Stats alone cannot prove this. What these statistics do is correlate education with pregnancy and sti rates – they seem to be linked but there is no evidence to suggest a causal relationship (perhaps teenager’s likelihood to get pregnant and their likelihood to finish school are both effected by a third unseen variable? We don’t know). B could only be inferred if a causal link between sex ed and pregnancy rates was totally proven.

    Gamsat Sample Questions

    June 21, 2012

Leave a comment  

name*

email*

website

Submit comment